Negotiating for Hostages, Negotiating for Business

This applies to the semantic difference between “that’s right” and “you are right”. “If you think about it in your own life, when you say ‘you’re right’ to someone, you are just trying to get them to go away,” said Voss. But following the psychologist Carl Rogers and his person-centered theories, Voss said “that’s right” suggests “a different psychological reaction” – something closer to empathy, a feeling that the speaker feels they are being respected. “‘That’s right’ indicates they feel you understand them,” says Voss. And at that point a deal becomes possible.

Source: Chris Voss: Negotiating for Hostages, Negotiating for Business